Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome : HLHS Zoloft Lawsuit

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) is a Zoloft birth defect side effect in which the structures of the left side of a baby’s heart do not fully develop. HLHS is a congenital birth defect, which means that is is present at birth.

HLHS is a among the most serious Zoloft heart defects. The medical term hypoplastic comes from the word hypolasia, which describes the severe underdevelopment of a tissue or organ. In a baby born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, the structures of the left side of the heart remain so small and underdeveloped that the heart cannot pump blood effectively to the rest of the body.

Without treatment, HLHS usually will cause a newborn’s death within a few days after birth. For a baby’s survival, it is critical that Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome is diagnosed quickly and proper medical care and treatment is provided without delay.

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) after Zoloft during pregnancy? You may have a right to file a Zoloft lawsuit to recover compensation for Zoloft HLHS side effects. Our national Zoloft injury and wrongful death law firm helps families across the U.S. file claims for Zoloft heart defect side effects damages. Time limits apply. Act now. Get a free, no-obligation consultation. Submit the Zoloft attorney contact form on this page or call us toll-free. 800-845-6913

In newborns diagnosed with HLHS, parts of the left side of the heart are much smaller than normal. There is not enough growth of the following structures:

  • Left Ventricle: One of four chambers (pump areas) in the heart
  • Aorta: The blood vessel that carries oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle of the heart to the body
  • Mitral Valve: The valve in the heart between the left atrium (LA) and the left ventricle (LV)
  • Aortic Valve: The valve in the heart between the left ventricle (LV) and the aorta.

Hypoplastic heart structures are too small and weak to pump blood effectively to the body. Babies born with HLHS usually become very sick shortly after birth. If the connections between the left and right side of the newborn’s heart are allowed to close after the baby is born, the infant may go into shock and death may result.

Symptoms and Diagnosis of HLHS

A baby born with HLHS may seem normal immediately after birth. Symptoms of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome usually begin to occur within the first few hours after birth, but HLHS symptoms may not develop for up to a few days after birth.
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome symptoms may include the following:

  • Blue or bluish/grayish skin tone (Cyanosis)
  • Rapid, difficult breathing (Tachypnea)
  • Fast, pounding heart (Tachycardia)
  • Poor feeding, not eating
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Sweaty or clammy skin
  • Being unusually tired, sleepy, lethargic or inactive

The symptoms of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome may resemble other heart problems and medical conditions. Newborns with HLHS symptoms are referred to a pediatric cardiologist for a diagnosis. In addition to physical examination, tests are needed to diagnose HLHS. These diagnostic tests include a chest X-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), and echocardiogram (echo).

Treatment of HLHS

If your baby is diagnosed with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, treatment must be started right away. HLHS treatment usually is provided by a team of pediatric cardiologists, surgeons, and other congenital heart defect specialists. The cardiologist may give your child a drug to prevent the closure of the ductus arteriosus (the connection between the left and right sides of the heart). Your child may be placed on a ventilator to to assist breathing. An IV may be given with fluids and drugs to help you child’s heart beat stronger.

Three Stage Surgery for HLHS

Most children diagnosed with HLHS undergo three-stage surgery to repair and reconstruct the left side of their heart. The surgery allows a single ventricle (pumping chamber) to pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body to meet the child’s needs throughout his or her life. In rare circumstances is a heart transplant may be possible treatment option.

Stage I – Norwood procedure

The first stage is the Norwood procedure. It is performed within a week after your child’s birth. In this procedure, the surgeon reconstructs the aortic arch and inserts a shunt connecting the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Typically, you child still will look pale blue or gray (cyanotic) after the Norwood procedure .

Stage II – Bidirectional Glenn procedure (hemi-Fontan)

The second stage is the bidirectional Glenn procedure (hemi-Fontan). It is performed when your child is 4-6 months old. The purpose of this operation is to allow blood to flow into the lungs directly from the body. This is achieved by connecting some of the veins carrying blood from the body to vessels delivering blood to the lungs.

Stage III – Fontan procedure

The third stage is the Fontan procedure. It is performed when your child is 18-48 months old. In this procedure, the rest of the vessels carrying blood from the body are connected to the vessels carrying blood to the lungs. This procedure allows oxygen-poor blood from the body to go to the lungs and prevents mixing of oxygen-poor and oxygen-rich blood from mixing in your child’s heart. After this operation, you child no longer should be cyanotic and look pale but or gray.

Prognosis for Babies with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

When Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome is diagnosed quickly and proper HLHS treatment is provided without delay, there is a good chance for survival to adulthood. Children who survive HLHS, however, may suffer chronic health problems and require lifelong observation and medical care from heart specialists to help them stay healthy. Because HLHS patients run a high risk of endocarditis, follow-up care with a cardiologist is needed and regular monitoring for the rest of their lives.

Zoloft HLHS Lawsuit : Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Settlement

Concerned parents and across the United States are choosing to file compensation lawsuit claims for Zoloft Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) damages. Zoloft lawsuits for HLHS damages allege that drug company Pfizer failed to warn of the HLHS side effects risks linked to use of the SSRI antidepressant drug Zoloft during pregnancy.

If you or a loved on took Zoloft while pregnant and your baby suffered Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, you may have a right to file a Zoloft lawsuit claim for substantial financial compensation and be entitled to a Zoloft HLHS settlement.

Contact us now for a free, no-obligation consultation with an experienced Zoloft lawsuit attorney. Let us answer all of your Zoloft HLHS heart defect lawsuit questions and help you recover the compensation you and your family deserve. Use the Zoloft attorney contact request form on this page or call us toll-free. 800-845-6913